“Bright jazz elements with a pop sensibility pervade the eclectic soundscapes of Lindby, whose phantasmagoric vibe is full of tight-knit arrangements in the spirit of the Great American Songbook, a dash of world music, polished vocals, and more.”

-Fort Worth Weekly

“Lindby makes stream-of-consciousness pop music that includes jazzy asides, choral movements, funky rhythms, squelching synths, soulful belting, group shouts and more; it’s a head-spinning, smile-inducing whirlwind.”                

-Independent Clauses

“There is an engaging joy that permeates the sound they are able to achieve, full of a silly, uplifting energy that is contagious.”

-Fort Live

“Lindby does some quite off-kilter stuff – ditty about Leif Erickson, anyone? – but keeps the energy high and the musicianship taut.”

-Fort Worth Weekly

Articles Featuring Lindby

(To read the original article, click here)

Christmas is coming early for fans of locally sourced Christmas music. Lindby is releasing its fifth annual album of holiday cheer, and you can see the five-piece live at Lola’s Saloon tonight. Last year’s EP featured Leon Bridges and Luke Wade, and this time around, Fort Worth natives The Hendersons are getting all kinds of jolly on the jam. At tonight’s show, ugly sweaters are encouraged. Tickets are only $5, and the doors open at 7pm.

(To read the original article, click here)

“The Chipmunk Song (Live at Rose Lea)” – Lindby Feat. The Hendersons. This is easily the only non-annoying version of this song I’ve ever heard. There’s a ’50s pop sweetness to the arrangement that works perfectly with the Christmas material.

(To read the original article, click here)

Its Christmas 24/7 here at Funkytownpodcast and this week we have the perfect band for your holiday spirit. Lindby joins us at One Horn Studios and we talk local Christmas music. They have 5 Christmas EPs now and they’re all fantastic. We hear music off of their newest offering, Lindby presents. The show starts off with Christmas in Killarney and the middle track is The Chipmunk Song and we close out with My Favorite Things. The Hendersons’ are featured on the EP. Find out how it all started. Find out what role Jme Knight and Aaron Knight had in the beginning. Lindby is more than just Christmas music and we talk about some of their other recordings like my favorite Erikson. I should probaby not mention it but we do Zach Libs this week. Ha Ha. Lindby was great. Missed having Ali there but the boys were awesome. I know its Christmas when Lindby is releasing a new EP. Its become one of my personal holiday traditons. Maybe we can get them back every Christmas!

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby — Lindby Presents: Holidays With The Hendersons.

RIYL: Planes that loop the loop.

What else you should know: We premiered the first track from Lindby’s fifth annual Christmas collabo record last week. Since then, though, the remaining three tracks have earned their release as well. In there, you’ll find covers of “Auld Lang SINE,” “My Favorite Things” and a deeper-voiced take on “The Chipmunk Song.” Speaking of The Chipmunks, if you’re curious as to what they’re up to these days, you can find them living out their dreams as the best ever death metal band in Denton.

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby – “Christmas in Killarney.”

RIYL: Dreaming of a green Christmas.

What else you should know: For its fifth annual Christmas offering, Lindby is once again joined by some cool guests. Collaborating with them on this year’s Lindby Presents: Holidays With The Hendersons is, well, The Hendersons. The full thing comes out on Monday, but they’ve agreed to give CT readers a sneak peek with this jaunty little Irish-inspired number.

(To read the original article, click here)

[…]
Texas band brings jazz-infused rock

Dallas/Fort Worth band Lindby brought attendees a different flavor of rock music: one influenced by Ween, the Beatles, Ben Folds and the Kinks. A quintet consisting of guitarist Nick Goodrich, bassist Kyle Claset, pianist Nick Spurrier, drummer Zach Mayo and Ali Grant on synthesizer and vocals, the group said the Conifer Loves Music series was its first gig in Colorado and a welcome change from Texas’ relatively season-less climate.

For about an hour, the band played a similar range of original tunes from their three studio albums and a smattering of covers, including tunes by David Bowie and a “cover of a cover” of the Shins covering the Postal Service’s song “We Will Become Silhouettes.”

“King of Condiments” was a fun tribute to what might be Tabasco sauce or any number of other condiments that trip the fancy of certain connoisseurs — highlighted by an upbeat bass line, electric keyboard and the call to “hop on the gravy train” — while “The Shaman” was introduced as a song about an old friend of Goodrich’s who was addicted to the online role-playing game “World of Warcraft.”

Much of the band’s performance bore hallmarks of the ska punk rock and jazz genres — a horn section wouldn’t have been out of place, nor would have a full-on organ or an upright bass. While not a sound accessible for all music fans, Lindby’s performance was filled with light-hearted asides and a confidence that comes only with years of practice.

Though all of the band members contributed vocals — Goodrich and Spurrier took the lead on a fair number of tracks — Grant’s talents were the star: a buttery range of octaves that belong on a jazz record. While Grant seemed reluctant to call herself the main singer, her bandmates said she does more of the singing than anyone else.
[…]

(To read the original article, click here)

Last Sunday within the comfy yet cavernous confines of Shipping & Receiving’s Tilt Room, hundreds of folks, all nominees in our 20th Annual Music Awards and their plus ones, gathered for the awards ceremony. The Panthys are like the Grammys except way cooler. People are wearing flip-flops at our event, for one thing.

Though most bands and artists were sweet enough to celebrate themselves and their victories on social media, lots of other acts were, I guess, too cool for school. In their honor (dishonor?), I bring you this column.

But before we get to the winners’ names, a message.

Apparently, some nominees didn’t get the invite. Despite the fact that I gave the day, date, and location of the event in this column two weeks earlier. Despite the fact that we’ve been doing this for two decades, and even if you’ve only glanced at our magazine in that time span or have been conscious in the local scene for longer than a few minutes, you would know that the ceremony always comes about two weeks after the festival. Anyway, we take full responsibility for neglecting to ensure that everyone who needed an invitation received one. We’ll do better next year.

The two biggest victors were, unsurprisingly, two of the biggest names in North Texas and, in one case, the universe. Leon Bridges took home top honors for Vocalist Performance with Lindby’s Ali Grant (“Merry Christmas, Baby”), which was also Song of the Year, plus Album of the Year (Coming Home), and Artist of the Year. The Quaker City Night Hawks won for Band, Drummer Performance (Matt Mabe on “Duendes”), Rock Song (“Good Evening”), and Rock Album (El Astronauta). Way to go, boys. And lady.

The biggest and best surprises, in my opinion, were Mean Motor Scooter for Rock (great band), Rage Out Arkestra for Jazz (lots of tribal fun), and Magnolia Motor Lounge’s Bryan Beckman for Talent Buyer (huge fan favorite, hard worker). Here are the rest of the winners: New Artist: VVoes. Americana/Roots: Kevin Aldridge (silver fox). Hard Rock: Panic Volcanic. Texas Music: Jake Paleschic. Heavy Metal: Pinkish Black (no strings, no problem). Live Band: Animal Spirit (well deserved). C&W: Holy Moly. Hip-Hop/R&B: Doc Strange. Avant Garde/Experimental: Year of the Bear. Pop: Son of Stan. Punk: War Party (summertime blooze). Acoustic/Folk: Jacob Furr. Blues/Soul: Luke Wade. Semi-Local Band: Oil Boom (a.k.a. The Oily Booms). Cover Artist: Big Mike Richardson. Electronic: Squanto (the best). Producer: Bart Rose (Fort Worth Sound). Venue: Lola’s Saloon (ninth year in a row). Other Performance: Jeff Dazey for Red Shahan’s “White Knuckle Heart.” Bassist Performance: Zach Tucker for Bomb Quixote’s “Hand Cannon.” Guitarist Performance: Ryan Tharp for “Bad Scene.” And EP of the Year: The Longshots’ Mucho Mango.

Congrats to all of the nominees and especially to all of the bands and artists in the great 817 that weren’t nominated but keep doin’ what they do.

(To read the original article, click here)

Last Sunday within the comfy yet cavernous confines of Shipping & Receiving’s Tilt Room, hundreds of folks, all nominees in our 20th Annual Music Awards and their plus ones, gathered for the awards ceremony. The Panthys are like the Grammys except way cooler. People are wearing flip-flops at our event, for one thing.

Though most bands and artists were sweet enough to celebrate themselves and their victories on social media, lots of other acts were, I guess, too cool for school. In their honor (dishonor?), I bring you this column.

But before we get to the winners’ names, a message.

Apparently, some nominees didn’t get the invite. Despite the fact that I gave the day, date, and location of the event in this column two weeks earlier. Despite the fact that we’ve been doing this for two decades, and even if you’ve only glanced at our magazine in that time span or have been conscious in the local scene for longer than a few minutes, you would know that the ceremony always comes about two weeks after the festival. Anyway, we take full responsibility for neglecting to ensure that everyone who needed an invitation received one. We’ll do better next year.

The two biggest victors were, unsurprisingly, two of the biggest names in North Texas and, in one case, the universe. Leon Bridges took home top honors for Vocalist Performance with Lindby’s Ali Grant (“Merry Christmas, Baby”), which was also Song of the Year, plus Album of the Year (Coming Home), and Artist of the Year. The Quaker City Night Hawks won for Band, Drummer Performance (Matt Mabe on “Duendes”), Rock Song (“Good Evening”), and Rock Album (El Astronauta). Way to go, boys. And lady.

The biggest and best surprises, in my opinion, were Mean Motor Scooter for Rock (great band), Rage Out Arkestra for Jazz (lots of tribal fun), and Magnolia Motor Lounge’s Bryan Beckman for Talent Buyer (huge fan favorite, hard worker). Here are the rest of the winners: New Artist: VVoes. Americana/Roots: Kevin Aldridge (silver fox). Hard Rock: Panic Volcanic. Texas Music: Jake Paleschic. Heavy Metal: Pinkish Black (no strings, no problem). Live Band: Animal Spirit (well deserved). C&W: Holy Moly. Hip-Hop/R&B: Doc Strange. Avant Garde/Experimental: Year of the Bear. Pop: Son of Stan. Punk: War Party (summertime blooze). Acoustic/Folk: Jacob Furr. Blues/Soul: Luke Wade. Semi-Local Band: Oil Boom (a.k.a. The Oily Booms). Cover Artist: Big Mike Richardson. Electronic: Squanto (the best). Producer: Bart Rose (Fort Worth Sound). Venue: Lola’s Saloon (ninth year in a row). Other Performance: Jeff Dazey for Red Shahan’s “White Knuckle Heart.” Bassist Performance: Zach Tucker for Bomb Quixote’s “Hand Cannon.” Guitarist Performance: Ryan Tharp for “Bad Scene.” And EP of the Year: The Longshots’ Mucho Mango.

Congrats to all of the nominees and especially to all of the bands and artists in the great 817 that weren’t nominated but keep doin’ what they do.

(To read the original article, click here)

Nominations:

BEST POP ACT – Lindby!

BEST “OTHER PERFORMANCE” – Nick Spurrier, keys (Lindby), “Trepak (Russian Dance)”

BEST VOCALIST PERFORMANCE – Leon Bridges, Ali Grant (Lindby) “Merry Christmas, Baby”

SONG OF THE YEAR – “Merry Christmas, Baby ft. Leon Bridges and Ali Grant (tanner4105 remix),” Lindby

EP OF THE YEAR – Dashing to the Show, Lindby

And below are some of our friends who helped us out on our projects who were also nominated!

BEST VOCALIST PERFORMANCE – Luke Wade w/ Lindby, “White Christmas”

BEST “OTHER PERFORMANCE” – Mark Smith, Haley Woodrow, Jonathan Woodrow, horns (Lindby), “Spread the Jam”

Article:

Music Awards Are Here

Welcome to our 20th Annual Music Awards, a celebration of all of the great tuneage that comes out of the great 817 every year. Here’s a primer. For both the uninitiated and old-head alike.

The Music Awards are just for fun, just an excuse to celebrate all of the great music in town. As unserious as the “competition” is, winning is a pretty big deal. Most bands receive thousands of votes. From all over the world. So. That’s pretty cool.

The Music Awards also aren’t supposed to be comprehensive. We do our best to highlight the best of the past 365 days or so. We lean on a few dozen local movers and shakers to help us choose our nominees. The ballot you see represents what these club owners, booking agents, and other North Texas writers/bloggers feel was most awesome since around last June. Your friendly Weekly staffers also offer input. Of course.

Maybe you’ll catch a mistake or two. Maybe a singer-songwriter will get pissed because he’s in the “Texas Music” category instead of the “Americana” one. Maybe some dude’s song is from 1997. Maybe some band is actually from Idaho. As much as we respect every nominee –– and every local band, especially the ones that haven’t been nominated –– we know enough about what we’re doing to have good reasons for doing what we do. Or something. Anyway, we can’t fix a mistake if we don’t know about it. If you spot any, e-mail Editor Anthony Mariani at anthony.mariani@fwweekly.com. We’ll verify it and, if necessary, make the change.
Or maybe you can bitch about it on social media. Because that’s always mature and helpful.
The ballot will run online 24/7 and in print every week from now until the night of the second day of the festival.
“Second” day of the festival, you say?
Keep reading.

MAF ’16 Will Be a Two-Day Event

The big change this year has to do with the festival. Instead of 48 bands in eight venues on one Sunday, we’re going to do 15 bands in four venues on a Saturday afternoon and early evening and 25 in five venues that Sunday afternoon. We’re still working out the details, but the gist of it is this: The shows on Saturday, June 25, will be 2-10pm on the Near Southside (The Boiled Owl Tavern, The Chat Room Pub, The Live Oak Music Hall & Lounge, and Shipping & Receiving Bar), the party on Sunday, June 26, from 4 to 9pm in the West 7th corridor (Fred’s Texas Café, The Grotto, Lola’s Saloon, Lola’s Trailer Park, and Magnolia Motor Lounge). Most of the lineup will be announced in about a week.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased through Ticketfly beginning this Friday. People who buy before Wednesday, June 15, will receive a complimentary download card of Frequencies, Vol. 7: Live in Studio. Proceeds from the sale of our annual compilation album featuring select nominees’ music go toward our annual charity sponsor (the United Way of Tarrant County this year). Reagan James, Son of Stan, The Hendersons, Oil Boom, and Bulls are just some of the contributing nominees. After June 15, $10 two-day advance tickets will be available through Ticketfly and $7 day-of-show tickets at select locations on the Near Southside and West 7th corridor.

On both fest days, you’ll also be able to purchase download cards of Frequencies for $5 a pop. The album will also be available via Bandcamp

Good luck to all the nominees and see you June 25-26.

Contact HearSay at hearsay@fwweekly.com.

(To read the original article, click here)

So… Lindby… what a score. What timing. Leon Bridges on your Christmas EP. Was that, a week ago that he played SNL, and only a few days after a Grammy nomination? “Merry Christmas, Baby” is off of this Fort Worth, Texas band’s 4th holiday EP, which I somehow had missed in the past. Be rest assured – they have been added to my “Bands Who Love Christmas Section.” Lindby’s electro-funk sets a nice stage for Leon and Ali’s vocals, and they both have voices that you kinda want to pay attention to! All the pieces come together to create a great version of a song that (IMHO) is normally covered by-the-numbers. The ending is the best part; You just gotta stay to the end.

Bottom Line: How did this premiere on Ft. Worth Weekly, and not some place like Stereogum… or Rolling Stone? Certainly a solid tune worth your time – and free on Bandcamp!

(To read the original article, click here)

For the past few years, nerd-poppers Lindby have put out a Christmas album with guest appearances by local musicians. This year’s version, Dashing to the Show, features two of the biggest names on the local/national scene: Leon Bridges and Luke Wade. The lads and lass of Lindby were kind enough to let us stream two songs from the upcoming E.P. The first track, “Merry Christmas, Baby,” is a duet between Bridges and Lindby singer/keyboardist Ali Grant; the second tune is a uptempo version of “White Christmas” soulfully crooned by Wade. You can download the whole album on Tuesday from the band’s Bandcamp page.

(To read the original article, click here)

And, for the fourth year in a row, Lindby released a new Christmas EP. This one kicks off with a beefed up remix of the Leon Bridges-featuring “Merry Christmas, Baby” from last year’s EP — a release that, let’s be real, should get a bit more attention this year, anyway. Another notable guest on the thing is fellow Fort Worthian Luke Wade. The whole thing is available for free download below.

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby’s Drive

Some bands want their albums to give the listener an idea of their sound. And yet others boldly go in the opposite direction, seeming to want to make each song sound completely different from all the others. That ethos is prominent on Lindby’s new album, Drive, which features something for just about every musical taste.

“Right You Are, Ken!” is so reminiscent of 1970s funk that you feel like listening to it in bellbottoms and platform heels, while “Today” is taken more or less straight from 1930s Tin Pan Alley songwriting that showcases the jazzy vocals of Ali Grant. “Sweet as a Tart” is pure bluegrass, with banjo picking and close harmony singing.

These songs are short enough to be done without the novelty value of each track wearing off, but “Radioworld” displays a juicy, sweet keyboard part that enhances the song’s feeling of floating toward the sky.

The band can write lyric-heavy songs, too, as evidenced by the folky comedy number “Edward McClanahan.” (“Edward was a dirty old codger / Who shot and buried his best friend Roger. / ‘He went away on a trip,’ he said / But in his freezer is Roger’s head.”)

You can only anticipate what this restlessly creative band has in store for us. –– Kristian Lin

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby’s Gingerbread Rock

The Fort Worth nerd-rock quintet known as Lindby –– guitarists and vocalists Nick Spurrier and Nick Goodrich, vocalist and keyboardist Ali Grant, bassist Kyle Claset, and drummer Logan Bowers –– have set up an awesome annual challenge for themselves: to release a Christmas EP that is sweeter, catchier, more free-spirited, and more genre-diverse than their last yuletide outing. With 2014’s four-song Gingerbread Rock, they’ve done it.

The old standby “Merry Christmas, Baby” is usually rendered as a naughty blues number, but singer Grant and guest vocalist Leon Bridges have turned it into a tight soul-pop duet with a hypnotically perky Casio riff and with Bowers’ percussion turning heavier and rockier as the song progresses. Rapper Doug Funnie drops “rhymes so funky, they make the whole place stink” on the hip-hop excursion “Christmas in Hyrule,” which features shiny plastic industrial-rock touches over the pinpoint beat. “Skating with Debussy” is a gorgeous, shimmering keyboard instrumental decked with plush billowing keys that halt, mid-song, into a nice melancholy nocturne. “It’s Christmastime!” features a rousing, cider-pickled singalong chorus from the band and guest vocalist Zach Mayo, embroidered from beginning to end with 1980s-style classic-rock synths that I’m pretty sure I haven’t heard since the glory days of Styx.

Gingerbread Rock is a jack-in-the-box of gleeful nerdy virtuosity, jumping out to give you a big hug every time you take it for a spin. –– Jimmy Fowler

(To read the original article, click here)

Staying out in The Fort, Lindby is just starting to tease its third annual Christmas EP, this one titled Gingerbread Rock. Like previous years’ efforts, this one features collaborations with several other notable locals. For instance, “Merry Christmas, Baby” is a retro duet between the band’s Ali Grant and local It Boy soulman Leon Bridges. Check that one out below, ahead of the group’s annual Christmas party at Lola’s, which will also feature Bogus Green, Rachel Gollay and another surprise act.

(To read the original article, click here)

POP

“It Happens Every Night” to fully formed newcomer Andy Pickett. Photo by Vishal Malhotra.
The dark horse may be Andy Pickett, the lovable scenester who, seemingly out of the blue, put out what may be the most popular pick for album of the year, It Happens Every Night. We’re still waiting for neo-disco machine Ronnie Heart’s new album and, now that we mention it, something new in recorded form from one-man Pointer Sister Nathan Brown. One artist who’s always got time to lay down some hot lixxx is Jordan Richardson, a.k.a. Son of Stan, whose latest, Georgia, is up for EP of the year. Richardson is almost as prolific as Taylor Tatsch’s vehicle, Shadows of Jets, whose new EP is on the way. Also look for new material from The Hendersons, Lindby, and Maurice Davis Band. The groovy and rocking Day Waster have been the opposite of Luke Wade & No Civilians, whose titular frontman went really far on The Voice, and The Unlikely Candidates, who have just returned from a major market tour. — A.M.

(To read the original article, click here)

Here’s the first batch of bands to play Fort Worth Weekly’s 12th Annual Music Awards Festival (MAF) on Sunday, June 22, at eight venues in the West 7th Street corridor.

And they are: Pinkish Black, Son of Stan, The Hanna Barbarians, Foxtrot Uniform, The Me-Thinks, Jetta in the Ghost Tree, Un Chien, FOGG, Secret Ghost Champion, Patriot, Ronnie Heart, Jack Thunder & The Road Soda, Huffer, Slumberbuzz, The Fibs, Missing Sibling, Mills & Co., Animal Spirit, Stone Machine Electric, Igneous Grimm, Lindby, The Royal Savages, Lazy Summer, and MidWay.

The remaining 24 bands will be announced next week.

All of the bands are nominees in our 2014 Music Awards (see: pg. 42), and all hail from the great 817.

MAF ’14, taking place from 4 to 10 p.m. at Capital Bar, Fred’s Texas Café, The Grotto, Lola’s Saloon, Magnolia Motor Lounge, Poag Mahone’s, The Pour House, and Rodeo Goat, is freeeee.

It’s like Christmas. But in June. And instead of presents, there’s local music. So, basically, it’s better than Christmas.

(To read the original article, click here)

POP

Frontrunners The Unlikely Candidates, who blur the line between mainstream rock and ferociously hummable indie, are currently recording their debut album for Atlantic Records. But the upstarts should get some stiff competition from Son of Stan, whose debut album, Divorce Pop, is creamy and melancholic all at once. Like SoS mastermind Jordan Richardson, Nathan Brown and Ronnie Heart love the ’80s: the groovier, the better. While Brown goes for drama and rock, the George Michael-ish Heart just wants to get butts shaking — the latter’s debut album, You(r) Mine, should be out soon. The Hendersons and JJ & The Rogues are definitely Anglophiles. We described the Rogues’ long-awaited sophomore album, Sweet Talker, as “if Emerson, Lake, and Palmer converged with Steely Dan on a coke-strewn recording console,” and The Hendersons’ recent string of singles is pure melodic bliss. (Think: The Beatles plus John Fogerty in pleasant mood.) Self-described “nerd rockers” Lindby can do pretty much everything, from jazz to classical to New Wave and even to Christmas standards. — J.F.

(To read the original article, click here)

OTHER PERFORMANCE

On rock keys, you’ve got Daron Beck on Pinkish Black’s “Ashtray Eyes” and Kris Knight on Un Chien’s “Speak Slowly.” Knight plays buttery chords in the piano’s sweet spot, displaying a mastery of dynamics. Beck builds to a haunting, high treble solo on a swirling bed of eeriness, beginning languidly, as if searching for something, before accelerating into wide, oscillating motions halfway through, only to smolder back into the primordial soundscape from which he came. Nick Spurrier also knows his way around a set of 88s, but on Lindby’s “Pure Imagination,” he dives into jazz, tying shimmering rolled chords to a string of blues-infused phrases to create a multilayered tapestry. Saxophonist Dave Monsch is also jazzy, telling a story on Flipside’s “Safe at the Cheeseplate” through sheets of bubbly, brassy sound that have all the drama and joy of a squeeze play. On Holy Moly’s “The Pace,” steel guitarist Ben Roi Herring goes from light, contemplative chords to lyrical, lilting lines that fit around frontman Joe Rose’s macho twang like a glove. Ukulelist Jeremiah Kirby chomps chords unrelentingly on Lazy Summer’s “Empty,” and noted guitarist Darrin Kobetich can also be quite nimble on the banjo. Case in point: the hypermelodic “Banjer in the Bayou.” — E.B.

(To read the original article, click here)

FEMALE VOCALIST PERFORMANCE

Ansley Dougherty on Panic Volcanic’s “Santa Maria” and Tina Downs on Deaf Angel’s “Run to Me” are like two sides of the same metallic coin — as Dougherty is pretty downtown, Downs is pretty Broadway. The remaining nominees aren’t nearly as heavy but are just as intense. On Un Chien’s “Against Love,” Rachel Gollay stretches out sexily but icily, and on Animal Spirit’s “Sam’s Song,” Sam Wuehrmann commands every note with a soft, insinuating performance. Ali Grant sounds as clear and lovely as spring water on Lindby’s version of the Willy Wonka hit “Pure Imagination,” and Steph Buchanan snarls wonderfully on The Diabolical Machines’ ’60s-inpsired rocker “Drag You Away.” — J.F.

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby’s Christmas on My Street

The novelty tune rules at Christmastime, and no one does serious musicianship in the key of cheeky like Lindby. The Arlington pop-rock quintet’s second holiday EP, Christmas on My Street (available for free download), may not be as tuneful as the first, Christmas with Lindby & Friends, but all of the band’s favorite genres — lounge-y jazz, synth pop, and souped-up indie-rock — are well represented, sending the Charm-O-Meter deep into the red (and green).

A horn-laced Steve-and-Edie-esque duet between keyboardist-singer Ali Grant and guest vocalist Larry g(EE), the title track is full of finger-snapping fabulosity that is utterly, undeniably infectious. Grant takes the same lyrics and spins them into a beautifully wistful confection called “Lights on a String” — her clear, rich, utterly sincere tones will raise gooseflesh in the best “Christmastime is here” kind of way.

A maddeningly catchy reworking of the Bach standard “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” by Moog keyboardist Nick Spurrier, “Jesu, Joy of Synth” gets an extra shot of merry from Logan Bowers’ quick-tumble drumwork.

Without breaking new territory, Christmas on My Street confirms that the season of musical joy and goodwill is a very Lindby time of year. — Jimmy Fowler

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby, ‘Christmas on My Street’

Arlington indie rock quintet Lindby isn’t interested in a conventional collection of Christmas tunes. For its second holiday EP in as many years, there’s a track drawing inspiration from Doctor Who ( Timey Wimey Christmas), a Bach composition rendered on a synthesizer ( Jesu, Joy of Synth) and a pair of original tunes, one of which ( Lights on a String) features some impressive, nuanced vocal work from Ali Grant. Not every seasonal batch of songs needs to be reverent, and Christmas on My Street is a nice reminder.

(To read the original article, click here)

Queen City Music Hall seats about 900 comfortably, and for last night’s Panthy Awards, the newly opened downtown venue was about 75 percent full with nominees in the Weekly’s 16th Annual Music Awards and guests. We received in excess of 125,000 votes over the course of about a month this year, and the big winners were Quaker City Night Hawks, taking home Artist of the Year honors as well as Best Band, Rock Album of the Year (Honcho), Rock Song of the Year (“Fox in the Hen House”), Best Live Band, Best Guitarist (David Matsler), and Best Drummer (Matt Mabe). The Hanna Barbarians also won a couple Panthys, for Best Rock Band and for EP of the Year (Spaceway Sessions, Vol. 1), Scott Copeland took home honors for Best Singer-Songwriter and Texas Music, and perennial favorite Josh Weathers won every category he was nominated in: Best Blues/Soul, Best Male Vocalist, Song of the Year (“Big Night in the City”), and Album of the Year (Big Night in the City). Below are the rest of the winners, with some awesome photos from staff photog Vishal “The Hindu Hammer” Malhotra. ’Til next year.

New Artist

We’reWolves

Americana/Roots Rock

Whiskey Folk Ramblers

Hard Rock

The Phuss

Hardcore

Cadillac to Mexico

Heavy Metal

Southern Train Gypsy

C&W

The Paychecks

Avant Garde/Experimental

Slumberbuzz

Pop

Lindby

Punk

War Party

R&B/Rap

Rivercrest Yacht Club

Jazz

Gunga Galunga

Acoustic/Folk

Tripp Mathis

Semi-Local Band

Whiskey Folk Ramblers

Cover/Tribute Band

Big Mike’s Box of Rock

Female Vocalist

Sam Wuehrmann (Animal Spirit)

Bassist

Jeremy Hull (Holy Moly, Mills & Co.)

Record Label

Dreamy Soundz Records

Booking Agency

Blackbox Presents

Venue

Lola’s Saloon

Producer

Jordan Richardson and Steve Steward

Indie-Rock Album of the Year

Skeleton Coast by Skeleton Coast

Hall of Fame

Casey James

Ken Shimamoto

(To read the original article, click here)

POP

Last year’s winner in this category, D-Snacks offer restrained, precise, and utterly infectious blends of pop, reggae, and hip-hop. Veteran Lannie Flowers continues his conquest of U.S. and European music critics with his warm, Beatlesesque hooks and gorgeous melodies. Singer-songwriter and former American Idol contestant Tim Halperin specializes in piano tunes that highlight his casual mastery of white-boy soul. Last year’s critically acclaimed album Indian Summer marked the end of an almost three-year hiatus for The Hendersons, the brainchild of Nolan Robertson, who plinks and plunks sunny, Donovan-like piano and guitar riffs with show-tune theatricality. Sounding like a different band from tune to tune, Kites & Boomerangs gracefully hop genres but maintain their anchor in world beats like ska and reggae. With Lindby, co-frontmen Nick Spurrier and Nick Goodrich give equal time to colorful synths and bright guitars. — J.F.

EP OF THE YEAR

EPs have risen in importance just over the past few months. Lots of bands have realized that perhaps the best way to stay on every listener’s radar is to release music in small doses a little at a time instead of in huge chunks every two years or more. Leading the charge is The Hanna Barbarians, who have just followed up their mind-blowing Spaceway Sessions Vol. 1 with Vol. 2. Both are extraordinary portraits of an ambitious young band that continues testing itself and pushing boundaries. The DIY collective Lo-Life Recordings has two nominees in this category, and they’re both rowdy splits: Doom Ghost’s and War Party’s Introducing … and The Longshots’ and Bitch Bricks’ self-titled work. A couple of post-rock-influenced outfits also got in on the EP action. Cleanup’s Wherever Your Place Might Be brings some rawk to the fusion party, and Drift Era’s Cosmic Intentions, Vol. 2 sounds like a proto-punk version of the soundtrack to Tron. A sense of the cinematic is also at play in Sym/BLKrKRT’s Precious Metals, Heavy Gems, a lean slice of trip-hopping trance that conjures images of the New York City underground in the future. As for Lindby’s Christmas platter, poppy fun and vocal acrobatics — and peace on Earth and goodwill toward men — are the names of the game. — E.G.

(To read the original article, click here)

MAF ’13: First Round of Bands Announced

Sorry, but it’s that time of year when I beat you unmercifully with stories about our annual Music Awards and Music Awards Festival. For this year’s free hootenanny –– Sunday, June 23, at eight venues in the West 7th corridor –– we’ve got early confirms from Burning Hotels, Fungi Girls, Pinkish Black, Calhoun, Whiskey Folk Ramblers, The Hanna Barbarians, The Phuss, KatsüK, Foxtrot Uniform, Year of the Bear, Sonic Buffalo, Dru B Shinin’, Jacob Furr & The Only Road, Stone Machine Electric, and Kyeyote.

Now just 34 more bands to go.

The ballot is near completion and will be published both online and in print on May 15.

As part of Music Awards every year, we also corral a bunch of nominees, ply them with free food and booze, and force each of them to record a live track for us at Eagle Audio Recording on the Near Southside. We then compile the tunes into a CD that we sell for charity. Through the $5-a-pop sale of our comps over the past several years, we’ve raised nearly $5,000 for our charity sponsors: SafeHaven of Tarrant County and the Tarrant Area Food Bank. Our 2013 comp is coming along just swimmingly. Get ready for new or previously unreleased tracks from Big City Folk, The Breakfast Machine, The Diabolical Machines, Dru B Shinin’, Ice Eater, Jacob Furr & The Only Road, Lindby, The Longshots, Missing Sibling, Patriot, Siberian Traps, Sonic Buffalo, Un Chien, We’rewolves, Year of the Bear, and a few more.

(To read the original article, click here)

So the ballot for our 16th Annual Fort Worth Weekly Music Awards is out . Lotsa bands on there, right? Too many? Nah. In compiling the ballot with my nominating committee –– local club owners, booking agents, Hall of Famers, and North Texas writers, who all write in their favorites on blank ballots –– I just didn’t feel like eliminating bands with low vote totals. Why not let the public be the ultimate deciding factor, right? I mean, to an extent. (There’s a good reason elections are never write-ins only. It’s called “chaos.”) Maybe next year, we’ll get all Minimalist and put a five-band cap on each category, but until then, we’ve got a ton of votes and a daylong 48-band festival to enjoy.

For this year’s blowout –– from 4 to 10 p.m. Sunday, June 23 –– we have the same number of venues (eight) and same number of bands (48). Along with perennial headliners like Burning Hotels, Quaker City Night Hawks, Calhoun, Whiskey Folk Ramblers, The Hanna Barbarians, and Pinkish Black, we’ve added some new blood, including Fungi Girls, The Longshots, recent Capitol Records signees The Unlikely Candidates, Ice Eater, Missing Sibling, Son of Stan, Constant Seas, Lindby, We’reWolves, Patriot, Raging Boner, The Breakfast Machine, Southern Train Gypsy, Sonic Buffalo, The Diabolical Machines, Animal Spirit, and The Fibs.

As always, admission to the festival is free, so call your boss now and tell him or her you’re gonna be late on Monday, June 24, and if you need to lock in a sitter that Sunday, well, whaddaya waitin’ for?!

(To read the original article, click here)

Part of the fun of South by Southwest, the music festival and conference that takes place in Austin every year, is tucking your badge away and hitting some nonsanctioned showcases, where you can really see a regional advantage at play –– a sanctioned showcase by a mid-level national act not from the Southwest might not draw nearly as well as an unknown Southwestern act’s non-sanctioned showcase at a club right next door. Remember that band Augustana? Were a big deal for a minute back in the day? From the wilds of San Diego? Well, I saw them at a sanctioned showcase one early evening on 6th Street, the festival’s main drag, a couple of years ago, and I was one of only four people in attendance. Four. After a couple of songs, I disposed of my empty beer bottle, walked out, and made a right turn into a club where a Texas band was playing. The place was packed. Now I’ve had many similar experiences, including one last year when I left another empty sanctioned showcase on 6th for a nonsanctioned show on South Congress that was pretty hopping. Again, the bill featured a bunch of Texas bands, including Calhoun, Quaker City Night Hawks, and Air Review. The event had been co-organized by Dallas’ Bergen Management and Blackbox Presents, the latter a Fort Worth booking and management company that will be putting on another nonsanctioned showcase with Bergen this year at the same location, Doc’s Motorworks (1123 S. Congress Ave., 512-448-9181). Artists already confirmed to play the two-day event include The Phuss, Oil Boom, Lindby, Doug Funnie, Larry g(EE), and Tricounty Terror, all Texas acts. Blackbox’s Aaron Knight also said some national bands might be thrown into the mix, which will allow us to witness firsthand the Southwest regional advantage. Or not.

Another cool thing about South-by is the cross traffic. Out-of-region bands on their way to or from Austin can end up playing Fort Worth, and Fort Worth bands always use South-by as an excuse to insert themselves into the Austin action. A bunch of Fort Worth bands are planning to play nonsanctioned shows this year, including KatsüK, Year of the Bear, Mailman, Bitch Bricks, Animal Spirit, Lindby, D-Snacks with Big Cliff, and Cleanup. And Pinkish Black drummer Jon Teague recently told me his band will also be going down and might even play whatever showcase Pitchfork is cooking up –– the operatic-metal duo recently played a showcase in New York City for the tastemaking online publication that is not shy in its love of all things pinkish and black. And like last year, Fort Worth-based New Media Recordings will be throwing a major bash, one that producer and NMR founder James Talambas plans to record. If you love Fort Worth music and consider South-by an escape from all of the, uh, great people you run into every weekend at Lola’s, The Grotto, or The Where House, you may want to slow your roll. It’s like Little Fort Worth down there every year.

(To read the original article, click here)

4.) Christmas with Lindby and Friends, Lindby/VA: Those crazy Lindby folks tackle December the 25th in their particularly light-hearted and skillful way. The centerpiece is a version of John Lennon’s “Happy Christmas (War Is Over),” featuring guest vocals by Calhoun’s Tim Locke, The Breakfast Machine’s Meghann Moore, Jody Jones, Larry g(EE), and Josh Weathers. But fellow nerdy travelers will find special pleasure in Lindby’s take on the classic duet “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” –– instead of two lovers, “Cold, It Is on the Dark Side” stars Luke Skywalker and Yoda on the planet Degobah [sic].

(To read the original article, click here)

It’s a safe bet that not many bands around here take the stage and perform the theme to Doctor Who, the video game soundtracks to Tetris and Super Mario Bros., or jaunty Bach fugues. But during a recent show at Lola’s Saloon, the four dudes and a chick who make up Fort Worth’s Lindby let their geek flags fly. Along with the high and low cultural references, the band pumped out an eclectic, high-energy set, pulsing with crisp synth riffs, flashy electric guitarwork, and sumptuous vocal melodies, most delivered chorus-style, to an enthusiastic crowd of nearly 50.

Guitarist and co-frontman Nick Goodrich confirmed the band’s anti-cool cool leanings, during an interview at his house/recording studio in the outer-reaches of Fort Worth, near Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. But he decried the label of “novelty band.”

“We consider ourselves pretty big nerds,” he said, “but we don’t parade it around. … We love the nerd aspect of music. We all love video game soundtracks, and we’re heavily influenced by television and movie songs. We grew up listening to so many video game songs, we almost owe it to them” to cover them.

Stylistically, the band casts a wide net, with a sound so diverse it’s as if the band members play a game of genre roulette before writing a song. Lindby’s sound, at its core, ranges from jazzy to indie-rocking, everything based on the band’s signature choral vocals and bright synths. Lindby’s style, said bassist Kyle Claset, is intentionally hard to pin down.

“It’s always been part of our goal to keep your ears guessing,” he said.

Though they are unabashedly eccentric, the members of Lindby are all musicians’ musicians. Four out of the five hold degrees in music from the University of Texas at Arlington, where the group formed.

Multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Nick Spurrier and Goodrich met in sixth grade. The two have been playing together consistently for about eight years. They met bassist Claset and vocalist/keyboardist Ali Grant three years ago in a choir class taught by Jing Ling-Tam, a professor of vocal studies and star of “The Jing Ling-Tam Blues,” a hilariously catchy number off Lindby’s 15-track debut album, Erikson.

“She’s our muse,” Grant joked.

“Basically if you enter into our lives and have an impact, we’ll write a song about you,” added Spurrier, who has a Lord of the Rings tattoo on his shoulder.

Despite the bandmembers’ serious musical training, there is no lack of quirk in their songs. On Erikson, the band’s subject matter varies from aboriginal medicine men (“The Shaman”) to a fascination with “Leif Erikson,” which includes the harmonized refrain “You sacked and sailed and drank / You loved your mother / Whoah-oh-oh, my Erikson.”

Typically, Spurrier writes the music and Goodrich the vocals. The band doesn’t have a frontman, choosing instead to divide vocal duties between Grant and Goodrich, with the others providing backup.

The Lindby-ites have been gigging and recording a lot and are hard at work on a Christmas album to be released on Thursday, Dec. 6. Christmas with Lindby and Friends will feature a who’s-who of North Texas musos and be anchored by a version of John Lennon’s “Happy Christmas (War Is Over),” with vocal solos by Tim Locke of Calhoun, Josh Weathers, Jody Jones, Meghann Moore of The Breakfast Machine, and Larry Gee. Other vocals throughout the album will be provided by members of Animal Spirit, The Frisky Disco, Slumberbuzz, and We’rewolves. Also included on the five-song EP is a Star Wars-influenced spoof of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” Instead of lovers, Luke Skywalker and Yoda on the planet Dagobah will be dueting. Christmas with Lindby and Friends will be available for free download at lindby.bandcamp.com.

The Lindby folks are planning to rework some of the material that didn’t make it onto Erikson for a new album this spring. First, though, they have to find a new drummer: Current stickman Tanner Brown is leaving (on good terms) and will continue to perform with the band until he is replaced. Brown is the band’s third drummer, a position, Goodrich joked, that has turned over as many times as the Defense Against the Dark Arts teachers in the Harry Potter novels.

In the meantime, Goodrich and Spurrier plan on adding to their nerdy repertoire, having just specially ordered the score to the Nintendo 64 version of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and the scores of various Super Mario Bros. games. Lindby wants to keep its audiences guessing.

“Hopefully there’s never a song where people are, like, ‘I guess I’ll go to the bathroom now,’ ” Goodrich said.

(To read the original article, click here)

There are a lot of reasons to love the crazy-ass kids in Lindby. Talent? Sure. The youngsters have got loads of that. But to be able to marshal that aptitude in the service of catchy, poppy, choral-vocal-heavy songs that skim the surface of novelty but don’t dive in completely makes Lindby just that much more worthy of admiration. The ensemble’s recent debut album, Erikson, is an “oddball opus,” according to Anthony Mariani, and is mostly about, well, people with that surname, including ol’ Leif the Viking. Why? Who cares! It’s silly. And good. And now Lindby is doing something unprecedented in the great 817: putting together an all-star Christmas record. Tim Locke (Calhoun), Josh Weathers, Jody Jones, Meghann Moore (The Breakfast Machine), and funkalicious Dallasite Larry Gee will take turns singing the five verses of the John Lennon classic “Happy Christmas (War Is Over),” the centerpiece of Christmas with Lindby and Friends. “We decided to [make the EP] because we know too many talented musicians not to do it,” Lindby co-frontman Nick Goodrich said with a laugh. But the biggest reasons, he continued, involve giving back to Lindby’s fans and musical cross-pollination. “Hopefully, our fans can discover some awesome local music,” Goodrich said. “Likewise, the fans of one group that is involved will see other people who are on the project and go listen to their stuff.” Group vocals will be provided by members of Animal Spirit, The Frisky Disco, Slumberbuzz, and We’rewolves, among others. Recording began at Lindby’s Euless home studio earlier this month. Other numbers include Mel Tormé and Bob Wells’ “The Christmas Song” (popularized by Nat King Cole); a live, lo-fi recording of two Lindby folks, Ali Grant and Nick Spurrier, performing the vocals-heavy ballad “Christmastime Is Here” (from A Charlie Brown Christmas); an electronica version of Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy”; “Cold, It Is on the Dark Side,” a Star Wars-influenced spoof of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” lyrically centered around Luke and Yoda on Dagobah; and that John Lennon tune, “the epic track that is the Fort Worth ‘We Are the World’ or ‘We Are Fort Worth,’ ” Goodrich joked. Recording should be wrapped up by early next week. The EP will be downloadable for free via lindby.bandcamp.com.

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby may well be the most interesting band in the Dallas/Fort Worth area music scene… Perhaps even beyond. When I first heard of them I came across a little bio on their online EPK where one of the lines from the bio was something to the effect of, “…Linby doesn’t believe in playing the same song over and over…”, rather, each song is an entirely new experience. Their music mines in such genres as Rock & Roll, Jazz, Electronic, Folk and even Classical, and that vast array of genres is readily displayed on their latest release, “Erikson”.

If you would like to know where the title, “Erikson”, came from, and want the full, in-depth story, then read THIS. However, the short answer would be that it began in high school when one of the band members (and a friend) wrote a song about a famous Erikson. More recently, Lindby dusted it off, improved upon it and then turned it into a song about a different well-known, historical Erikson. That song then became the lead track on the record.

Clocking in at nearly 90-seconds, “Erikson, Leif” is like most of the songs from this album: Short and to the point. Plus, even the band has admitted that these songs Erikson songs are just meant to be “goofy”, which is shown in this song by the few sentences that are repeated throughout. “…You sacked and sailed and drank. You loved your mother. O-oh my Erikson.” And while they keep the mood light for the song, they don’t let that impede their musicianship. Four out of the five band members, Nick Spurrier, Nick Goodrich, Kyle Claset and Ali Grant, all serve as vocalists, and this song sounds like it features all of them. Easily the best moment of the song is at the end when they all harmonize on the final line, their voices mixing to create a gorgeous sound.

I find “Jing Ling Tam Blues” to be an interesting hybrid between Jazz, Blues and Rock. The keyboard part, which runs throughout the song, certainly gives a sound like those two former genres. Then the song explodes, and there’s no question that it becomes more of a Rock tune. It’s almost impossible not to get into this one, which sounds like it could easily be an anthem of the bands’, and you will most likely find yourself shouting right along with chorus, “JING LING TAM!”.

“King Of Condiments” is the longest song on this record (barely over four minutes) and, as the name might imply, it is an interesting song. There are three different distinctive parts to it, the first of which is light and fun, as well as being co-sung between one of the guys and Ali, lasting through the first chorus, “Hop on the gravy train, it goes only where the sun is shining…”. As the music fades out, some drumbeats count them into a much faster, more aggressive section of the song. The lyrics are spit out at such a rapid pace it’s hard to keep up, let alone even comprehend what is being said, as whomever is doing the singing alters their voice, I presume to imitate the “King of Condiments” character, who the second verse is written for. That then suddenly gives way to a more dreamy sounding verse, which Ali sings in a more classical manner, before returning to the same way it began. It’s a very unique mash-up of music, and despite how this might make it sound, they manage to give it a good flow so that it all fits together.

The next Erikson the band tackles is businessman, “Erikson, Sheldon”. It’s another short tune, which they made into a sultry Jazz number. The keys are definitely the backbone of this song, and while embodying the Jazz sound, they also give it a somewhat modernized Jazz sound. It is certainly unlike anything else heard thus far on the album, and is a definite standout.

“Piece Of Reese” is a fun little diddy that relies heavily on the synthesizer. It’s fun listening to simply to hear the various affects they use throughout it. At times the sound effects sound like they would have been perfect in an old school videogame (say, circa late 80’s to early 90’s), while at other parts it sounds more outer spacey. This one will definitely grow on you with each listen, and I started out thinking it was just so-so, but now, I really dig it.

“Across The Blue” begins with a stunning piano part, which sounds quite classical. The co-singing on this song is brilliant in the first place, but making it even more attention grabbing is the operatic voice that Ali taps into for a few fleeting moments. It gives the song a rather refined quality, as well as a certain level of elegance.

The previous song blends seamlessly into the next, “Erikson, Jon/Across The Blue (Reprise)”, a song that pays homage to a man who swam the English Channel eleven times. Some of the lyrics from the previous song carries over into this one, with the addition of a brass section (trumpets and a trombones) featured on this one. However, the song has a sound that is more reminiscent of Reggae, giving it a more tropical vibe. It’s just a happy, upbeat tune. And who knows, if you find yourself feeling a little blue, listening to this one just might make you feel a little better.

Possible the most original song on this entire album is “Gee! Sharp Diminished Over Bee”. It’s hauntingly beautiful, and the only instrument used is the piano. As pretty as the keys sound, I find a certain level of eeriness to them, too. The verses are sung in rounds, which I find extremely inventive, and adds a wonderful layer to the song. While the chorus’s are sung in sync, and are done in fantastic fashion.

“Deadlights” is an interesting song in the fact that I could hear it being performed as a Country song, and sounding very similar to what it does now. The opening line is, “Don’t cry for me, cause you’re gonna bring me down. Baby, please…”, and really, doesn’t that sound like an ideal opening line for a Country tune? I guess there are some subtle sounds where you can draw comparisons to the genre, but that’s as far is it gets. Also, the vocals for this song are often belted out with a deep fiery passion that is sure to reel you in.

The shortest track you will find on this record is about mix martial artist, “Erikson, Tom”. Lindby again achieves a sound that his fully unique to this song, by imitating an Oriental sound, and doing a great job of it at that. It’s very tranquil and the perfect harmonies, which are done more in a chanting manner, serve to make it only more relaxing.

Perhaps the most experimental song on this record is “The Shaman”. It utilizes a very electronic sound, on one hand sounding very futuristic, while on the other it sounds videogame-ish. It uses the same basic qualities as other Lindby songs (i.e. three-part singing/harmonizing), however, it strays so far from the style(s) of music I like, it’s the one song on the album I just don’t fully “get”. I’m not even saying it’s a bad song, because I don’t dislike listening to it, but it just doesn’t mesh with me like their other songs do. But if this is the only song I can say that about, out of fifteen, that’s not too bad.

With “Simple As That”, the bands style returns to some more Rock roots, similar to some songs you heard early on, on this concept album of sorts. There are some sweet guitar riffs that you can hear on this tune, which come across as walking that fine line between being both simplistic and fancy… And I mean that in a positive way. There are some solos that are very slick sounding, though it doesn’t come across, like, they wrote those parts to show off (Am I the only one who occasionally gets that feeling when hearing some guitar solos? As if the musician wrote it just to say, “Look what I can do!”). Instead, it just flows with the song, and gives it a lot of extra pizzazz.

As the album begins to draw to a close, there are a couple more “Erikson’s” to cover, such as “Erikson, J.S.”. Granted, it’s not based on a real person, nor is it a full body song, at least not in the sense that there are lyrics accompanying it, but it’s not some simple instrumental song, either. It’s a four-voice fugue they comprised, basing it upon the Erikson melody. It’s entertaining, and offers a good way to break up the other “true” songs that comprise this record. And that’s coming from the guy who usually dislikes instrumental songs with a passion, so you know it has to be worth listening to.

“Here We Are Now” offers a true end to the album, and is a fitting one at that. It’s a very up-tempo song, and despite what reading the lyrics would lead you to believe, it’s actually gives a pretty optimistic feeling. “My heart has no sense of tomorrow for you, but you’re calling and you’re singing the blues…” Ali sings, starting the first line. This is also another song that has a Classical vibe, and if you imagine it, you could easily hear this song being played inside some lounge circa the 1950’s. That aura is only personified by the piano part, which is the backbone of the song, and is also responsible for making this one of my most favorite tracks on the record

I said that previous song is the “true end” to the album, and I say that because the final song is what the band has admittingly said is them “…goofing around in the studio, having fun…”, and they aptly titled the minute and thirty-seven second long track, “Erikson, Jam”. That’s all it is, a jam of sorts, with the band just cutting loose and (quite obviously) having some laughs, which is what makes this a good fitting end to the record, because in the end, Lindby is a fun band.

“One-trick pony” is a phrase that can be applied to a lot of bands these days, when most bands seemed more concerned with trying to replicate what is “popular”, instead of expressing their own creativity. That is far from the case with Lindby, though.

Every song on “Erikson” has a sound that is truly all its own, and even with all the genres their music spans, it still manages to have a wonderful flow. It’s an album that’s all lighthearted and fun, but not to the point where it all comes across as if they aren’t being serious. Quite the contrary, these are five musicians who have some serious chops and know exactly what they’re doing.

I think we need more bands/songs/records like this. There’s nothing wrong with your typical Rock band (or any other genre for that matter) who makes music more along the traditional lines, with serious songs about broken hearts or whatever else. But it’s bands like Lindby, who weave these interesting tapestries of music, that break up the monotony of all those other bands out there. And sometimes, those are the best bands there are.

(To read the original article, click here)

The Many Sounds of Lindby

I was running late the first time I met the band Lindby, still hobbled by my most recent surgery. Rare to get a whole sextet but that’s exactly who met me at The Boiled Owl a couple of weeks ago. Led by a couple of Nicks, Goodrich and Spurrier, musically bound since their days in an upstart sensation known as Five in the Eye, of which they say, “We slapped people with our sound.” Between those fellows, I’m introduced to the affianced Kyle Claset (bass) and Ali Grant (keys). The band is filled out by Tanner Brown on the drums. These are charming and friendly people who can easily communicate in the most technical language of music as song titles like “Gee! Sharp Diminished Over Bee” indicate. It is easy to hear hyperactive revelry in the music, either on record or in person. On the debut album, Erikson, the band can be heard morphing from genre to genre, occasionally in the same song.

The concept album celebrating the son of Erik the Red bounds through a zoo of genre sounds: 80s electro, ska, Beach Boys and all matter of pop variations. When they go for the pop hook Jugular, they score with vocal emphasis indicative of their extensive training in music school. The record strikes quick with the stupidly re-listenable “Jing Ling-Tam Blues,” a garage shouter with a mother of a break. The song is a reference to UTA Director of Choral Studies, who can actually be heard at the end of the track saying, “It has been absolutely wonderful to discover the human voice,” as part of a sound collage. The disorienting collage adds to the psychedelic sense of the record, challenging the listener’s sense of each sonic suit they change into. We speculate for a while on the titular professor’s reaction to the tune. They describe her classes as being quite literally hands on, “She would put her hands on people, to help them find their voice.”

There is an engaging joy that permeates the sound they are able to achieve, full of a silly uplifting energy that is contagious. In my own convoluted listening it was as though Ben Folds and Frank Zappa’s nerdy cousin ran off with members of Polyphonic Spree and rode a cloud of Adderall on a sonic odyssey full of musical and lyrical in jokes and polyvocal hijinks. Though the lyrical says, “I don’t write the songs, but I can make the right words sound wrong,” the songs reflect funhouse mirror sense of flux, as Spurrier adds, “We change things all the time, this allows us to really switch the context.”

Lindby was recently a part of two overcast occasions, the Fort Worth Music Festival and the Southside’s Arts Goggle. We’ll be seeing more of them around town in the coming months, as they have started playing shows through local showmakers Blackbox. Our conversation wound from gear to talk of future touring, we honored South Park as “the greatest hero of all time,” and for the first time in my life a tattoo was presented at the mere mention of Lord of the Rings. I have no doubt that there are certain people for whom this is a gamechanger. Their album, Erikson, is available in many places; give it a listen to boost your midweek mood. Look for the exceptional songsters at the Doug Funnie CD release with Doom Ghost (11/2 at The Grotto).

(To read the original article, click here)

“Adventuresome,” “experimental” and “quirky” are not the usual terms I append to “pop-rock,” but Lindby‘s Erikson necessitates it. How else to describe an album that celebrates six different people (two fictional) named Erikson in songs that are re-situations of the same melody? How about a band that sings an aggressive ska tune named “King of Condiments”? Lindby makes stream-of-consciousness pop music that includes jazzy asides, choral movements, funky rhythms, squelching synths, soulful belting, group shouts and more; it’s a head-spinning, smile-inducing whirlwind. I could go on listing things that are in this album, but it would get tedious for you: just know that there’s a ton happening. (One more: pseudo-Asian tune about a boxer!) The album isn’t as out-there as a Half-Handed Cloud record, but they’re approaching that level of eclecticism, with similar fantastical results. If you’re into something a little left of center but still hummable, this one’s for you.

(To read the original article, click here)

Lindby’s Erikson

Listened to Erikson. Here’s what we know. Some young, seemingly normal Arlingtonians harbor a perverse fascination with people (real or imagined) sharing the surname Erikson. The first track off Lindby’s long-time-in-the-making debut album is “Erikson, Leif,” and “Erikson, Sheldon,” “Erikson, Jon,” “Erikson, Tom,” “Erikson, J.S.,” and “Erikson, Jam” are the titles of assorted interludes. Pass the crack pipe!

And then there’s the music, a weird mélange of occasionally blustery electric guitar riffs mixed with horns and weird synths, smart sing-songy melodies, and choral vocals reminiscent of The Polyphonic Spree. (Sadly, any band with more than two people singing either in harmony or unison draws comparisons with the Spree, the biggest band to popularize the form.)

You could call Erikson a concept album. Most of the lyrics are silly and fabulist (“The King of Condiments,” anyone?), and the 15-track work is often visited by the melodic reprisal “Erikson / Whoah-oh-oh, my Erikson.”

Home-recorded and self-released, the album captures a band whose aspirations far outstrip its cashflow for Grade-A recording technology and knowhow. You can only imagine what producer Jim Guercio would have done with this stuff back in his heyday in the late 1960s with Chicago and Blood Sweat & Tears. The raggedness here kind of cheapens the genuine expansiveness of the melodies and arrangements, rendering the compositions sloppy rather than raw, organic, and unpretentious, the effects that Lindby was probably going for –– “probably” because the people in the band are crazy.

Not that there’s anything remotely pretentious about this oddball opus. (Paging Dr. Demento.) Next to The Doors’ “Shaman’s Blues,” Lindby’s “The Shaman” is probably the best song about aboriginal medicine men you’re ever going to hear. It’s an early-’80s-inspired dance-rock hit revolving around a groovy, twinkling synth figure and a huge, glorious superhero-theme-song chorus. “Jing Ling-Tam Blues,” undoubtedly named after the professor of vocal studies at the University of Texas at Arlington, is a rocker built around a soaring choral vocal refrain and crunchy guitarwork, and “Piece of Reese” is scandalous and catchy.

Erikson could be a lark, but all of the songs are professionally performed and sprinkled with moments of auditory glee. Not quite Viking-caliber but killer nonetheless. –– Anthony Mariani